GRADUATE STUDENTS

If you are thinking about working with me, I am assuming you have interests in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. This is good. It is an interesting field of study and an area of psychology that embraces a Scientist-Practitioner model. However, please make sure you are familiar with our program before applying. It is not a dedicated I-O program: Organizational Psychology is only one of two speciality areas in the Applied Social Psychology program. The other speciality is Community/Health Psychology. Our students take courses in community and health psychology–even if they will primarily do research in one area. We have an enriching program where you will get diverse training from multiple perspectives.   Your research responsibilities Most of my research occurs outside of a lab, so if you choose to work with me, you will in all likelihood be doing some field research. Nevertheless, you will also have access to the Occupational Health and Well-Being Research lab  facilities.  I will not assign a research topic to you, but the topic you pursue must be consistent with my research interests if I am to be of any use to you. As you become more senior, my expectation is that you will assume some responsibility for developing your junior colleagues. Most of this will be in an informal manner, and consists mainly of sharing whatever wisdom you have gained in your years at graduate school (or other pertinent experiences).  
Fundamentally, what I look for in a graduate student, apart from scholastic achievement (a membership in Mensa doesn’t hurt), is a person seeking collaboration–not just with me–but with their colleagues.   Finally, at this stage in your educational career, it is time to embrace ambiguity, abstraction, paradox, and the mutability of knowledge. If you seek hard and fast rules, templates for all occasions, or a parental figure that will answer your every question, you might want to find another advisor. I learn from students and their research every bit as much as they learn from me.  
Greg A. Chung-Yan, PhD Industrial-Organizational Psychology
Where my students are now Andrea Butler, PhD Director, Competency-based Management Solutions: HRSG Behdokht Rekabdar, MA Research Consultant, Research and Advisory, Organization Development: Rogers Communications Christin Moeller, PhD Benefits Realization (Evaluation) Lead: TransForm Shared Service Organization Barat Wolfe, PhD (Academic, tenure- track) Assistant Professor, Psychology Curriculum Coordinator: SUNY Lisa Plant, PhD candidate Consultant, Assessment and Succession: Knightsbridge Kelly Meservia-Collins, MA Director, Academics & Interprofessional Education: Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre

GRADUATE

STUDENTS

If you are thinking about working with me, I am assuming you have interests in Industrial-Organizational Psychology. This is good. It is an interesting field of study and an area of psychology that embraces a Scientist-Practitioner model. However, please make sure you are familiar with our program before applying. It is not a dedicated I-O program: Organizational Psychology is only one of two speciality areas in the Applied Social Psychology program. The other speciality is Community/Health Psychology. Our students take courses in community and health psychology–even if they will primarily do research in one area. We have an enriching program where you will get diverse training from multiple perspectives.   Your research responsibilities Most of my research occurs outside of a lab, so if you choose to work with me, you will in all likelihood be doing some field research. Nevertheless, you will also have access to the Occupational Health and Well-Being Research lab facilities.  I will not assign a research topic to you, but the topic you pursue must be consistent with my research interests if I am to be of any use to you. As you become more senior, my expectation is that you will assume some responsibility for developing your junior colleagues. Most of this will be in an informal manner, and consists mainly of sharing whatever wisdom you have gained in your years at graduate school (or other pertinent experiences).  
Fundamentally, what I look for in a graduate student, apart from scholastic achievement (a membership in Mensa doesn’t hurt), is a person seeking collaboration–not just with me–but with their colleagues.   Finally, at this stage in your educational career, it is time to embrace ambiguity, abstraction, paradox, and the mutability of knowledge. If you seek hard and fast rules, templates for all occasions, or a parental figure that will answer your every question, you might want to find another advisor. I learn from students and their research every bit as much as they learn from me.  
Greg A. Chung-Yan Industrial/ Organizational Psychology